Ifshin Violins
Rare & Fine Instruments

The Ifshin Collection of Fine Violins
We at Ifshin Violins have always been proud of our extensive collection of fine string instruments and bows. We currently are fortunate to have an unusually large selection of fine violins. If any of these fine violins are of interest to you, please give us a call. We will be delighted to give you more information.

From $10,000 to $20,000

Stefano Conia

Stefano Conia

Cremona, 1998. Conia studied with Pietro Sgarabotto, G.B. Morassi and Francesco Bissolotti in Cremona. Since his graduation in 1972, he has worked not only as a master luthier, but also as a professor at the International Violin Making School in Cremona, specializing in varnish and restoration techniques. He has also served as a judge in several prestigious violin making competitions. This violin is characterized by a rich, translucent red-brown varnish and a tone to match. With great playability and projection, this instrument would be ideal for a fine violinist.


Luigi Rovatti

Luigi Rovatti

Buenos Aires, early 20th century. Rovatti studied with Enrico Ceruti before emigrating to Buenos Aires in 1885 where he joined many other fine Italian makers who were encouraged to move to Argentina. This violin has a brilliant, responsive tone.


Charles Résuche

Charles Résuche

Bordeaux, 1909. Résuche worked in Paris with Gand and Bernardel and at Lyon with Justin Diter before settling in Bordeaux in 1897. This attractive violin has a big, full bodied responsive tone.


Concetto Puglisi

Concetto Puglisi

This excellent violin has a nice powerful, very responsive tone.


Luigi Mozzani

Luigi Mozzani

Bologna, 1932. Mozzani was a guitar prodigy as a youth who began constructing plucked instruments. He opened up a successful workshop making plucked and bowed stringed instruments. The workshop employed several talented luthiers, and received instruction on violin making from the renowned Carletti family. This violin was made after moving to Bologna, where the business thrived. It has a strong, sweet tone.


Giorgio Corsini

Giorgio Corsini

Rome, 1978. Giorgio Corsini, trained as a classical violinist, began making in 1945 and by 1952 had taken over the workshop of the great Rudolfo Fredi. He became famous, not just in Rome but all over Italy for his skills as a maker, restorer and expert. He won numerous awards for his work at numerous competitions. This beautiful violin is in almost perfect condition and has a clear responsive tone, with easy playability.


Alfredo Gianotti

Alfredo Gianotti

Milan, 1979. Gianotti made his first violin in 1943 in a concentration camp. He went on to exceptional and beautiful instruments. He won numerous gold medals at the Cremonia Biennial competition and other important competitions. This beautiful violin was made while he was at the peak of his career.


Roger & Max Millant

Roger & Max Millant

Brothers Roger and Max Millant were among the most respected European makers of their generation. Beginning their studies with their prize winning grandfather Sebastien-August Deroux, they continued their studies with Mougenot in Mirecourt and with Dykes in London. After establishing their own shop in Paris in 1930- shortly before turning 30- they quickly developed fame for constructing instruments of robust tone and elegant craftsmanship. During the course of their career, they won prizes in Cremona, The Hague, and Liege, among others. We have 2 examples of their work at this time. Both these violins are classic examples of their work. One, made in 1949, is of extremely attractive wood and a rich red varnish, and has a clear warm tone filled with resonance and color. The other, made in 1953, is easy to play and has a nuanced, rich tone with characteristic power.


French, labeled Nicolaus Amatus

French, labeled Nicolaus Amatus

From the workshop of N. Vuillaume, Mirecourt. Nicolas Vuillaume, borther of Jean Baptiste, made fine instruments for his brother as well as for others.


Robert Beyer

Robert Beyer

Berlin, 1912. Robert Beyer’s shop in Berlin employed several top master craftsmen and was one of the most important in that great music capital. Over the years he won a number of awards and medals for his instruments. This unusually beautiful violin has a very full, powerful tone.


Gary Vessel

Gary Vessel

Modesto, CA. 2012


Marco Minnozzi

Marco Minnozzi

Ravenna, 2007. Marco Minnozzi has been making violins for over 25 years. He trained with Renato Scrollavezza in Parma and has worked with V. Nigogosian, Horacio Pineiro, and Rene Morel in New York. His work is sought after all over the world. This beautifully crafted violin has a full, warm tone.


J.E. Hardwick

 J.E. Hardwick

Ashtead, Surrey, 1958. Hardwick was a pupil of George Wulme Hudson. This violin has a brilliant, powerful tone.


Andrea Schudtz

Andrea Schudtz

Cremona, 2016. Andrea began his career in violin making with his father in Moscow and was already an established maker when he began his studies at the violin making school in Cremona, graduating in 1995. He has won numerous awards at international competitions.


Mario Frosali

Mario Frosali

Los Angeles, 1977.

A violin prodigy in youth, Frosali graduated from the Florence Conservatory in 1908. He learned violin making from Giuseppe Scarampella, and proved to be an excellent student. He moved to New York where he was employed at the important Emil Herman shop, working with Simone Sacconi. He moved to Los Angeles in 1939 where he worked for Wurlitzer. He also managed the Brown violin shop before establishing his own workshop in 1954. Frosali is undoubtedly one of the finest luthiers in California’s history. He made about 75 violins, all of very fine quality, inspired largely by Guadagnini, but also Guarneri Del Gesu. This violin was made when he was 91 years old, and is his personal model. Despite his advanced age at the time, the violin sounds bold and quick, with a fresh resonance. It is ideal for a young, upcoming musician.


Carlos Funes Vitanza

Carlos Funes Vitanza

San Francisco, 2006. Carlos Funes studied violin making in Cremona at the violin making school and worked in Cremona for a period before returning to San Francisco. Even after many years away from Italy, his instruments show many characteristics of the Cremona School.


Carlos Funes Vitanza

Carlos Funes Vitanza

2010


Maurice Bourguignon

Maurice Bourguignon

Brussels, 1925. After apprenticing with Chevrier in Mirecourt (from age 13) and working at major shops in Paris, Bourguignon went to Brussels and worked with G. Mougenot. He took over his shop in 1910. During his career, he won numerous medals for his work. This violin is in superb condition and has a powerful, brilliant tone.


Daniele Tonarelli

Daniele Tonarelli

Cremona, 2012. Since graduating from the school of violin making in Cremona fifteen years ago, Daniele Tonarelli has distinguished himself in a number of competitions around the world. This beautifully crafted violin is in the classic modern Cremona style. The tone is even, warm and clear.


Lorenzo Rossi

Lorenzo Rossi

Milan, 2007. Rossi graduated from the Parma school headed by Scrollevezza and has also studied with Greg Alf, Guy Rabut, and Carlos Arcieri in New York before opening his workshop. We have just received this violin and were immediately impressed with the beauty and elegance of the workmanship as well as the tone.


Marco Pedrini

Marco Pedrini

Cremona, 2007. Pedrini began his studies in violin making at the age of 14 in Cremona, winning a prize as the school’s best student in 2000. After studying with Giorgio Cé at the school, he apprenticed with the renowned luthier, Giorgio Grisales. In 2008 he established his own workshop in Cremona. This instrument is easy to play, and has a clear, fresh sound.


Joseph Vautrin

Joseph Vautrin

Chaumont,1924. Vautrin was a composer and violinist in addition to being a fine luthier. He trained with Chipot-Vuilaume, later heading the workshop of Emile Germain. In 1894 he set up his own shop in Chaumont, France, where he remained until his death in 1937. This violin is typical of his production, with its dark red varnish and Stradivari inspired model. The tone is quite potent, full and warm. It is also in an excellent state of preservation, looking like it just left his workshop.


Mattia Paolo Riva

Mattia Paolo Riva

Varese, 2008. We recently met this gifted maker and were very impressed with his work. This striking violin has a lustrous red-orange varnish. The tone is also impressive, powerful, brilliant, and tremendously responsive.


Scrollavezza & Zanré

Scrollavezza & Zanré

Parma, 2007. Elisa's father Renato Scrollavezza founded the famous violin making school in Parma so she was deeply involved in the world of violin making from childhood. In 2002, Elisa formed a partnership with Andrea Zanré, also a Scrollavezza student. In their workshop in the historic center of Parma, they concentrate on making new instruments along with training the next generation of violin makers. Mr. Ifshin just chose three violins from their selection and we are delighted with them. We also chose two of the violins made in their Parma workshop under their direction which represent an excellent value.


Borja Bernabeu

Borja Bernabeu

Cremona, 2008. Borja comes from Madrid, but started his training in violin making in the U.S. He moved to Cremona to study at the violin making school. After graduation, he worked with Silvio Levaggi and Alberto Giordano before establishing his own workshop. In 2006, Borja won two silver medals for a violin and viola at the Violin Society of America competition in Baltimore.


Fernando Solar

Fernando Solar

Madrid, 1967. Fernando Solar is considered one of the most important Spanish makers of the 20th century. His instruments are known for their full, rich tone. This violin is a fine and characteristic example of his work.


Michele Ferrari

<a name=Ferrari17432></a>Michele Ferrari

Cremona, 2014. Ferrari graduated from the Cremona violin making school ten years ago and has worked with Massimo Negroni and Elio Severgnini. He works both in Cermona and Madrid. We picked this violin from our last Cremona exhibition.


Marcello Bellei

Marcello Bellei

A few years ago, Mr. Ifshin met this gifted maker in Europe and was most impressed with his work. He is clearly one of the most talented makers of his generation. He studied with Scrollavezza at the school in Parma. We currently have a selection of Marcello's violins.


Marco Nolli

Marco Nolli

Cremona, 2000. Nolli, like many of the top Cremona makers, was fortunate to have been at the school when Stefano Conia and Giorgio Scolari were teaching there. Since graduation, he has won numerous medals at competitions all over Italy and has launched a very successful career. This violin is now a few years old and has been "played in." The tone is smooth, clear and responsive.


Arturo Virgoletti

Arturo Virgoletti

Canossa, 2006. Virgoletti is the son of a woodworker and lute maker and was introduced to violin making by Ferdinando Garimberti. After making several violins, he began a ten-year apprenticeship with Sesto Rocchi. Starting in 1993 he began working with the Bisollottis (both father and son).


Ernst Heinrich Roth

Ernst Heinrich Roth

Markneukirchen, 1920s

The town of Markneukirchen in Saxony has been famous for violin making since the mid 1600s when the first violin making guild was formed. By the late 1800s more than a quarter of a million string instruments a year were being shipped all over the world with almost half the production coming to the U.S. After WWI, production in Markneukirchen dropped significantly but the companies that remained started to concentrate on the making of higher quality instruments. At the beginning of the 1920s. Ernst Heinrich Roth I (1877-1948) took over the operation of the Roth family firm and began to produce violins of exceptional quality. These fine violins were so popular in America that Ernst Heinrich sent his son Ernst Heinrich II (1890-1961) to this country to represent the firm. By the 1930’s, production decreased due to the rise of Nazism and the war. In spite of that, we still see fine Roth violins from the 30’s and even the late 40’s. Under Communist rule, the firm was taken over by the government and their building confiscated. In 1953, the business was re-established in Bubenreuth, West Germany and they began production of high quality violins, violas, cellos and bows.

Today, Ernst Heinrich Roth violins from the 1920’s are in great demand because of their exceptional quality and are increasing in value. Although originally the 1920s Roth violins were made in 13 different quality grades (reproductions of works of famous Cremonese violins by Stradivari, Guarneri and Amati), there is actually little difference in the different models in terms of quality. Some of these violins are labeled Eugen Meinel and are similar to the Roth violins and have comparable value. We have always searched for Roth violins from the 1920s and usually will have several examples available.


Heinrich Th. Heberlein

Heinrich Th. Heberlein

Markneukirchen, 1908. Though the Heberlein workshop produced many instruments, they maintained high standards of quality, both in workmanship and tone. Made while Heberlein Jr. still ran the shop, this instrument is a classic example of his high level, commercial output. He won several medals in the late 19th century for his violins, and was well regarded during his lifetime and beyond. This violin has a strong, clear, resonant sound.


Auguste Delivet

Auguste Delivet

Paris, 1913. After serving his apprenticeship in Mirecourt with his uncle Victor Rambaux, Delivet went to Paris to work with H.C.Silvestre. He opened his own shop in Paris in 1892. In 1918 he left Paris for Canada. It seems that his best work, such as this violin, was that done in Paris. He won numerous awards and medals during those years.


George Craske

George Craske

Possibly Stockport, England, latter 19th century. Craske was a very prolific maker who worked anonymously for much of his career. After he died, W.E. Hill & Sons purchased and labeled all of his instruments. None of these instruments are dated. The workmanship of Craske's instruments can vary a great deal. This is one of the best examples we have seen. The tone is warm and rich.


Saeid & Shahram Rezvani

Saeid & Shahram Rezvani

Over the last 25 years the brothers Rezvani have made more than 500 violins, violas, and cellos. They began their studies in Iran with Ibrahim Ghambari Mehr, ex-student of the Parisian master, Etienne Vatelot, and later in Vienna with Johann Rombach. They continue perfecting their art as members of the Violin Society of America, working with such masters as Joseph Curtain. Now based in Los Angeles, they produce excellent instruments. Their work is very characteristic, resonant and sweet, easy to play, rich in tone color. We are very fortunate to have several of their instruments at this time, perfect for a young musician.


Otto Paulus

Otto Paulus

Markneukirchen, 1948.

Otto Paulus was one of the finest luthiers of the long established Paulus family of Markneukirchen. He studied with his brother, Albin Ludwig Paulus Jr. before setting up on his own in 1904, passing his master’s examination in 1914. This collector’s quality violin is pictured in “Vogtländscher Geigenbau” by Zoebisch, the most important book on violin making in the Markneukirchen area. The tone is brilliant, nuanced, and responsive.


Paul Mangenot

Paul Mangenot

Mangenot worked for several important luthiers in France, including Justin Derazey, Collin-Mezin, and Hel. In 1888 he took over the Derazey workshop, which owned the rights to the D. Nicolas Ainé and Honoré Derazey labels. After 1920, Mangenot only made instruments with his own label, including this one. This violin is one of the best Mangenots we have seen, and is in superb condition. The workmanship is elegant with a rich orange-red varnish. The tone is sweet and enticing, ideal for chamber music


R.Guiton

R.Guiton

Cork, 1898. Although little is known about this obviously talented maker, this violin exhibits a great deal of skill with a French influence. There are interesting handwritten inscriptions inside referring to an important event in Irish history.


Paolo Fanfani

Paolo Fanfani

Cremona, 2010. A talented young maker, Fanfani studied with Angelo Sperzaga at the International School of Violin making in Cremona. After graduating in 2003, he worked in the shop of Sperzaga. In 2011 he opened up his own shop in Piacenza. This violin was made while working with his master, and has a clear, even, ringing tone.


Fabrizio Di Pietrantonio

Fabrizio Di Pietrantonio

Livorno, 2004. Born in Livorno in 1964, Pietrantonio worked with several important makers who trained him in the traditions of the Bisiach family and especially Igino Sderci. This violin is a reproduction of the model of J.B. Guadagnini and has a wonderful, rich tone of great character.


Luigi Merighi

Luigi Merighi

Modena, 1974. Born in 1905, Merighi was a self taught maker, constructing violins based on the models of the Cremonese school. This violin was made when he was nearly 70 years old, and is characteristic of his rustic charm.


Caussin Workshop

Caussin Workshop

Neufchâteau, mid 19th Century, labeled Gaspar da Salo. A great violin for the musician looking for an instrument with a full, dark, rich tone.


Silvio Barbieri

Silvio Barbieri

Mantua, 1998. Son and pupil of Bruno Barbieri, Silvio is a direct inheritor of the Mantuan tradition. His father was strongly influenced by Scarampella and Ornatti. This violin is exquisitely crafted and is in perfect condition.


Jules Grandjon

Jules Grandjon

Jules Grandjon worked in Paris and Amsterdam before opening his very successful workshop in Mirecourt in 1850. His work won a number of medals at a number of competitions at Paris and London. This is a beautiful example of his work with a big powerful tone.


Fine old German

Fine old German

c. 1800. This elegant, 200 year old violin is a unique example of German work in excellent condition. It has a rich, dark tone with plenty of power.


John Harrison

John Harrison


Marianne Jost

Marianne Jost

Cremona, 2016. We felt that this violin was a standout from our most recent Cremona Show and decided to buy it for our collection. Marianne Jost is from Switzerland and started her training at the Cremona school of violin making in 1993, graduating in 1997. She also worked with a number of master teachers like Vicenzo and Francesco Bissolotti and Giovanni Lucci for bow making. She has won a number of awards over the years. This beautifully crafted violin has a big, brilliant responsive tone.


Branded “E.H.Superior”, Emil Herrmann workshop

Branded “E.H.Superior”, Emil Herrmann workshop

Berlin, early 20th century. Emil Hermann was one of the most important violin dealers in Berlin, later opening a shop in New York in 1924. Among his clients was Jascha Heifetz, who purchased his famous Guarneri Del Gesú in 1922. Among his employees were great luthiers like Simone Sacconi and Mario Frosali. Hermann acquired fine violins from the best luthiers in Germany to sell in his shop. This particular instrument was made for and sold by Hermann, and is in new condition, looking as if it was recently made. It has an exceptional tone, full and powerful.


Stefano Trabucchi

Stefano Trabucchi

Cremona, 2016. Trabucchi graduated from the Cremona International School of Violin making in 1988, at the young age of 18. At the school he studied with Massimo Negroni and Stefano Conia, before apprenticing with Marco Nolli for four years. Since 1992 he has had his own shop in the historic center of Cremona. He has won numerous prizes for the high level of his work. This violin is a fine example of his art. It is light in the hand, easy to play and produces a brilliant, colorful tone.


Jean Bauer

Jean Bauer

Angers, 1952. Son of a violin repairman, Jean Bauer trained with Marius Didier in Mattaincourt before settling in Le Havre, Normandy, in 1936. With the turbulence of the Nazi occupation, Bauer moved to Angers, where he spent the rest of his celebrated career. He was highly decorated for his instruments at competitions in Paris in 1929, 1931 and 1937, Toulouse, in 1931 Angers, in 1942, and The Hague, in 1949. This violin is made on his own model, at the height of his abilities, with characteristically stellar workmanship and beautiful red-orange varnish. The instrument is in superb condition. The tone is vibrant and rich, at once nuanced and powerful.


G.A.Pfretzschner

G.A.Pfretzschner

Markneukirchen. The G.A.Pfretzschner workshop in Markneukirchen is best known for their fine bows, but also produced exceptional string instruments as well. This beautiful violin has a truly fine tone.


Herman Geipel

Herman Geipel

Copy of "Earl" Strad. Herman Geipel’s workshop made superb violins from 1884 when he oponed his own workshop through the 1930’s. We very much like Geipel violins for their workmanship and especially the sound. Geipel was famous for his varnish techniques. His work was popular all over the World and especially in England.


Wilhelm Kapfhammer

Wilhelm Kapfhammer

1999. After studying at the violin making school in Mittenwald in his native Germany, Kapfhammer moved to Salt Lake City and taught at the violin making school there in the mid 70’s. He has worked primarily in Salt Lake, but also for a number of years in the Bay Area. The tone is powerful, responsive and brilliant.


Albin Ludwig Paulus Jr

Albin Ludwig Paulus Jr

1935. After WWI, violin making in Markneukirchen started focusing on higher quality “Art Violins” rather than less expensive student work. This violin is an excellent example of these fine instruments. Albin Paulus studied with Dölling and established independently while still in his 20s and continued until 1946. Tonally, this violin is powerful, brilliant and responsive.


Albert Knüpfer

Albert Knüpfer

Wernitzgrün. This exceptional maker worked for a number of important makers including A.Wunderlich, E.Reinhold Schmidt and H.Glass before setting up in his own shop in 1904. This fine violin is illustrated in the important book on Vogtland violin makers by Zoebisch (pp.194-195). It is in superb condition and has a fine tone.


Martin Erician

Martin Erician

1994


Paolo Virgoletti

Paolo Virgoletti

S.Polo d’ Enza, 2015. Paolo began his training with his uncle Arturo Virgoletti in 1999. Moving to Cremona, he worked with Elio Severgnini. While there, he had the opportunity to restore fine old instruments and study closely the work of the masters. He worked with master makers in Tokyo and Madrid before opening his own workshop in S.Polo d’Enza near Parma. This beautifully made violin has a full, rich tone with great warmth.


G.A. Pfretzschner

G.A. Pfretzschner

 


Tonino Boga

Tonino Boga

Turin, 2005


Collin Mezin fils.

Collin Mezin fils.

1924


Alfred Lanini

Alfred Lanini

San Jose, CA 1915. Although born in California, Lanini studied in Italy, first with Romeo Antoniazzi and then with Farotti in Milan from 1911 to 1914 before returning to San Jose. This violin is in almost new condition and has many characteristics of the maker's masters.


Fine Old German

Fine Old German

Labeled Wolfgang Klotz


Daniel Delfour

Toulouse, 2002


Herman Geipel

Herman Geipel

Markneukirchen, 1935. Herman Geipel’s workshop made superb violins from 1884 when he opened his own workshop through the 1930’s. We very much like Geipel violins for their workmanship and especially the sound. Geipel was famous for his varnish techniques. His work was popular all over the World and especially in England.