Ifshin Violins
Rare & Fine Instruments

The Ifshin Collection of Fine Bows

Over the years, Jay Ifshin has acquired many fine bows from the most skilled contemporary makers and has kept some of the best for his personal collection. He has recently put several particularly nice bows from his collection on sale. This in addition to an already spectacular selection of fine bows makes now an excellent time to upgrade your bow!

Violin Bows

Pierre Simon

Pierre Simon

Paris, c. 1860.

Pierre Simon is universally considered one of the greatest 19th century Parisian bow makers. After his apprenticeship in Mirecourt, he went to Paris to work with D. Peccatte, then worked for a time with J.B. Vuillaume. In 1846 he set up his own shop, then took over Peccatte's shop when he returned to Mirecourt. This bow is one of the finest of his work and is in amazing condition. It even has its original tinsel wrapping and bears the J.B. Vuillaume brand. It is accompanied by a certificate by Raffin.

Nikolai Kittel

Nikolai Kittel

Widely considered to be one of the greatest bowmakers ever, Nikolai Kittel was originally trained as a violin maker. He was so successful in fact, that his early laurels include being named official luthier for the Imperial Orchestras in 1828 and Purveyor of the Household of the Tsar in 1835. Undoubtedly his brilliant talent in bowmaking helped him attain these titles and turned him into an international household name.

We know he was already producing some of the world’s best bows by the early 1830’s. His native St. Petersburg was a thriving port city, importing large quantities of Brazilian pernambuco for its textile industry. Kittel selected only the finest pernambuco for his bows, all but assuring the quality of his bows. Starting with the finest materials, he studied the works of Francois Xavier Tourte very carefully, taking pains that his bows were at once flexible and strong. During his lifetime and beyond, these bows were highly sought after by Russia’s wealthy nobility and Europe’s preeminent concert musicians.

This is an excellent example of bows made by Kittel himself in the first half of the 1840’s. Made of an excellent stick of pernambuco, this bow hugs the strings, drawing a rich and clear tone. It would be a great addition to a collection of fine bows just as it would be the ideal bow for a concert violinist. It is accompanied by a certificate from Yung Chin.

E.Sartory a Paris

E.Sartory a Paris

Sartory is arguably the greatest bowmaker of the 20th century. He began his training with Charles Peccatte, later working with Alfred Lamy, who greatly inspired his work. Sartory set up on his own in 1889, having already established a reputation as an excellent maker among his peers. Even before World War I, his reputation had grown so much that he hired several assistants, including Hermann Prell and Otto Hoyer. After the Great War he hired such fine archetiers as Jules Fetique, Louis Morizot, and Louis Gillet. With the help of such fine assistants, he was able produce bows to satisfy the ever growing demand for his work, always finishing and perfecting the bows personally. This bow is a particularly fresh example of his later work. Strong and well balanced, it draws a clear and rich tone, ideal for any professional musician.

John Dodd

John Dodd

We are very pleased to offer this superlative bow from one of the first great English bowmakes on record. Surprisingly, John Dodd was originally trained as a gun-lock fitter. Later, constructing scales for money, he used his fine skills in detailed engineering in constructing bows for the violin family. Of the same generation as the unparalleled F.X. Tourte, Dodd’s bows are slightly shorter in length, but still earned him the nickname “The English Tourte.” Despite his excellent workmanship and superb quality, Dodd struggled financially his whole life and died in penury in 1839. This bow is one of his later works, more modern in style than his earlier Baroque and Cramer styles with their open trenched frogs. This bow is in excellent condition and has all the qualities of a fine old bow: rich sound, multi-layered in tone color, classic feel. This would be an excellent part of a collection, as it would be for a professional violinist.

Francois Lupot

Francois Lupot

We are pleased offer this fine bow by the influential Francois Lupot. One of the earliest innovators of the bow, Lupot was the brother of Nicolas Lupot, the first “modern” French violin maker, and one of the finest French luthiers ever. Francois eventually moved to Paris where he likely worked with Leonard Tourte, and, like all aspiring archetiers of the time, was heavily influenced by the great F.X. Tourte. Lupot made a name for himself, later inventing the metal slide that protects the frog. He also trained Lafleur and Dominique Peccatte, eventually turning his shop over to Peccatte in 1838. This stick is a classic example of Lupot’s finest work. Fashioned from a choice piece of pernambuco, this bow is rich and nuanced in tone. It is in excellent condition and is ideal for a collector or professional.

Auguste Lenoble

Auguste Lenoble

The life and work of Lenoble are inextricably connected with the Peccatte family. In 1901, composer and author Laurent Grillet reported that he apprenticed with Francois Peccatte. Francois learned the craft from his older brother, Dominique, arguably one of the greatest bowmakers of his generation, and one of the finest archetiers in history. Working mainly in Mirecourt, but also for a couple of years for Vuillaume, Francois’ most inspired work is superlative. He died at the age of 34, before realizing his full potential, but not before training some talented bowmakers.

One of these young talents was Lenoble. Seven years the junior of his teacher, he worked in obscurity until around the early 1860’s, when he moved in with Francois Peccatte’s young widow. This was an important step in his professional advancement. The Peccatte family was synonymous with bow making, and any connection he could make to the family name could only help business. This connection was more than just political. He trained Charles Peccatte, son of Francois, and developed a business connection with him. In addition to being a fine maker, he was an excellent teacher.

This bow is flexible with good strength, easily producing a clean spiccato. It feels light in the hand and would be perfect for orchestral playing.

Alfred Lamy

Alfred Lamy

One of the central figures in French bow making, Joseph Alfred Lamy began his studies at the age of 12 with Husson, and later Arthur Vigneron. In 1876, at the age of 26, he began an apprenticeship with Voirin, later becoming his assistant. Voirin had tremendous influence on Lamy’s work, both in artistic concept and execution. Upon Voirin’s death in 1885, Lamy set up his own workshop in Paris, beginning a flourishing career as an independent bowmaker. He won silver medal in the 1889 Paris exposition and gold medal in the 1900 Paris exposition. He also taught his son, Hippolyte Camille Lamy the art, as well as Eugene Sartory. This is an excellent playing bow, nimble and strong, optimal for any technique required of a fine violinist.

Joseph René Lafleur

Joseph Ren&eacute Lafleur

Paris. Son of and successor to his father Jacques, Joseph René surpassed his father in the quality of his bows. Before taking over his father's shop, he did spend some time in the Lupot workshop. He is generally considered one of the finest and most inventive makers of his generation.

Victor Fetique

Victor Fetique

Paris. Fetique 19040We are delighted to be able to offer these two unusually fine examples by one of the finest makers of the early 20th century.

Jean Joseph Martin, branded Chanot

Jean Joseph Martin, branded Chanot

Paris. Martin was an archetier of great skill whose production was of high quality right up until his death in 1910, at the age of 73. After serving an apprenticeship in his native Mirecourt, he moved to Paris where he worked for Vuillaume, going on to be one of the firm’s great makers. He established his own workshop in the early 1860s. Although he was one of the best Parisian bowmakers of his time, he mostly made bows for other firms. This bow, branded Chanot, is a fine example of his work and is accompanied by a Raffin certificate.

Louis Gillet, branded Dupuy

Louis Gillet, branded Dupuy

Shortly after leaving the Thibouville-Lamy workshop in 1911 at the age of 20, Louis Gillet served in the French army and was wounded in action during World War I. He supplied bows and repairs to various luthiers until 1934 when Sartory hired him as his assistant. After Sartory died in 1946, he continued on under the supervision of Georges Dupuy, Sartory’s son in law. Gillet’s bows changed in form during his career, though Sartory had a strong influence on his work. This bow is typical of his later period- the head is big and strong and the stick is powerful yet feels quite light. This bow is in an excellent state of preservation, looking like it just left the maker’s bench.

Justin Poirson

Justin Poirson

Paris. The son of a winegrower, Poirson studied with Nicolas Maire before working for Vuillaume in about 1870 and later. After Vuillaume died in 1875 he worked for the important Parisian firm, Gand and Bernardel. He set up on his own in 1879. His later bows were sometimes heavy in nature but always reflect his early training. He was murdered at the age of 74 while living in miserable conditions in the outskirts of Paris. This bow is one of the finer bows he produced. It is in excellent condition and is accompanied by a Raffin certificate.

Emile A.Ouchard

Emile A.Ouchard

Paris, 1945. One of the greatest makers of the 20th Century, Emile A. Ouchard began his training at 13 years of age with his father in the Cuniot-Hury workshop. He set up his own shop in Paris in 1940. This bow was made in 1945, at the height of his ability, and is a characteristic example of his style in every way. This bow was purchased directly from Ouchard in Paris in 1945 by the only prior owner. It pulls a robust and rich tone from any instrument and is perfectly balanced.

Emile A. Ouchard

Emile A. Ouchard

Paris, c. 1948. This gold mounted bow from one of the greatest and most prolific bow makers of the 20th century was made in 1948, shortly after he moved to New York. By this time his fame had grown so much, by the summer of 1948 he agreed to an exclusive contract to supply bows for William Lewis and Son. This bow is an excellent example of his work from his best period.

Jean-Jacques Millant

Jean-Jacques Millant

One of the finest archetiers after World War II, Jean-Jacques Millant studied with the Morizot family from 1946-1948 before working with his father and uncle, Roger and Max Millant. Setting up on his own in 1950, Millant developed a fine reputation, eventually being awarded the title of “One of the Best Craftsmen of France” in 1970. Around 1980 he only made bows mounted in ebony and gold. This collector's quality bow is in mint condition, having been purchased directly from the maker in the early 1990s and is accompanied by the original bill of sale.

Branded Gustave Bernardel (by C. Thomassin)

Branded Gustave Bernardel (by C. Thomassin)

One of the most important bow makers of his generation, Claude Thomassin studied with C.N. Bazin in Mirecourt before going to work for Gand and Bernardel around 1885, at the age of 20. Because much of his production was sent to dealers, many of his bows are branded with shop names such as Gand & Bernardel or Gustave Bernardel. This bow was made between the years 1892 and 1901 when he supplied bows to Gustave Bernardel. It is a classic example of his work during this period and handles nimbly while drawing a clear, rich sound.

André Chardon branded Chanot & Chardon

André Chardon branded Chanot & Chardon

In addition to being a talented bowmaker, André Chardon was also a renowned violin repairman and successful businessman. He headed the family company, Chanot-Chardon, selling fine quality bows and instruments. Grandson of the great violin maker Georges Chanot, Chardon began training as a luthier with his father at the age of 15, shifting to bow making after World War I. Because the family firm occupied much of his time, he was not as prolific as many of his peers, though the quality of his production was quite high. Part of his success as a bowmaker rests upon his grandfather’s collection of first rate pernambuco. This bow is flexible and strong, pulling a clear, rich sound. It is accompanied by a Millant certificate.

Claude Thomassin

Claude Thomassin

Paris, stamped Caressa & Francais and Gustave Bernardel on opposite sides.

After working for Gustave Bernardel from 1892-1901, Thomassin set up his own shop where he began making bows with his own stamp. This bow was likely made for Gustave Bernardel around 1901, shortly before Caressa & Francais bought them out. Because the shop had a significant inventory, the new owners branded the bows with the new stamp. It is an excellent playing sick, with dense, lively wood.

Marcel Fetique

Marcel Fetique

Son and student of Victor Fetique, Marcel worked closely with his father shortly after World War I until 1930 when he set up on his own. Though his output was somewhat limited, much of his production is of the same quality as his father’s. This bow shows some influence of Ouchard. It is a very good playing stick, striking the balancing between flexible and resilient. It is accompanied by a Millant certificate.

J.J. Martin

J.J. Martin

Paris. Martin was an archetier of great skill whose production was of high quality right up until his death in 1910, at the age of 73. After serving an apprenticeship in his native Mirecourt, he moved to Paris where he worked for Vuillaume, going on to be one of the firm’s great makers. He established his own workshop in the early 1860s. Although he was one of the best Parisian bow makers of his time, he mostly made bows for other firms.

Louis Bazin

Louis Bazin

The youngest son of C.N. Bazin, Louis apprenticed with his father, later taking over his workshop in 1907. Throughout his career he employed bow makers to help him out –including his son- always maintaining a high standard. Many of his bows were made for dealers, but he also made many bows with his own brand. This bow is in superb condition and is easy to play, drawing a rich and nuanced tone.

C.N.Bazin, stamped J.Hel

C.N.Bazin, stamped J.Hel

Charles Nicolas Bazin was one of the most important bow makers from Mirecourt in the last two centuries. Apart from being a great craftsman, he was also a great teacher and businessman, running a very efficient workshop that supplied bows of high quality to many shops in Paris and beyond. Around 1870 he made bows for the violin maker Joseph Hel in Paris. This bow is typical of his early work, fashioned from wonderfully marbled pernambuco producing a stick that is thin, responsive and powerful.

Mars Auguste Husson

Mars Auguste Husson

Paris. After training with his family in Mirecourt, Husson worked for Thibouville-Lamy, and in 1906 for C.N. Bazin. After moving to Paris in 1910 he worked for Vigneron. In 1925 he set up his own shop, after which time he began branding his bows with his name. This bow shows the influence of Andre Vigneron, and is well balanced, strong and flexible.

Louis Morizot branded Boulangeot a Lyon

Louis Morizot branded Boulangeot a Lyon

This bow was made when Morizot worked with Sartory, probably before World War I. It is one of the best Morizots we have seen and is in near mint condition. Emile Boulangeot was the principal maker to the Lyon Conservatory and ordered bows to sell his customers. This bow would be a good fit for a professional musician or collector. It is accompanied by a Raffin certificate.

Gand & Bernardel

Gand & Bernardel

Possibly by Thomassin. The illustrious firm, Gand and Bernardel, hired many of the finest bowmakers in France in the late 19th century. One of these makers was Claude Thomassin, whose distinctive style during these years was heavily influenced by his first master, C.N. Bazin. This bow, likely made c. 1890, bears the faintly visible stamp of the Gand and Bernardel firm. The wear at the handle indicates that it was well loved by a player for many years, and the good condition of the stick demonstrates it has been well preserved. It feels exceptionally smooth across the strings and is offered at a player’s price.

Bernard Millant

Bernard Millant

Paris,1947 engraved on ferrule. Bernard Millant is the most respected appraiser of bows of his generation. He was also a very fine bowmaker, winning prestigious prizes in Liege in 1954 and 1969, and Ascoli Piceno in 1959, among others. He began his studies with his father and uncle, the famed luthiers, Roger and Max Millant. He perfected his bowmaking with Morizot before setting up on his own in 1950. His production is limited because he spent his entire career making, repairing and appraising bows in addition to being a talented luthier. This bow is one of the first he made and is an excellent playing stick.

Morizot stamped P. Serdet á Paris

After training with Cuniot-Hury and then C.N. Bazin around the turn of the century, Morizot went to work with Sartory around the time of World World I. In 1919 he set up his own shop in Mirecourt and early on began supplying various luthiers and dealers with unstamped bows of fine quality. Paul Serdet was one such luthier. Serdet studied with Justin Deraay and worked for H.C. Silvestre. He won gold medals for his work 1889 and 1900. This bow is a fine example of Morizot’s work, well balanced, strong and flexible.

Charles Bazin

Charles Bazin

Several examples. Son of Louis Bazin, and grandson of the extremely influential Charles Nicholas Bazin, Charles Bazin was one of the most important bow makers of the mid- 20th century. He was active in bowmaking by the age of 15, opening his own shop shortly after World War II. He had only one assistant, and made bows of fine quality for clients throughout France, the United States, and beyond. His bows are strong yet sweet, bridging the gap between the old tradition and new school of French bowmaking. They represent an excellent value in a classic French bow.

Justin Poirson

Justin Poirson

Paris. Poirson was a pupil of the great Nicolas Maire and then went on to work with J.B.Vuillaume where he got to know the great bowmakers of the time. After Vuillaume’s death he worked with Gand and Bernardel. In 1880 at the age of only 29, he had set up his own workshop. This bow has exceptional playing qualities and we consider it an excellent value in that it is nickel mounted.

Cuniot- Hury

Cuniot- Hury

In 1884, at the age of 22, Eugene Cuniot took over his father’s firm, later adding his wife’s well known last name to his brand. Like most makers around the turn of the century, he was greatly influenced by C.N. Bazin, both in style and business model. Thus he had many archetiers in his workshop and supplied bows to dealers and violin shops throughout France. Despite having up to 12 makers working for him he was able to maintain quite a high level of quality. One of the bow makers, Emile Francois Ouchard, took over the firm in 1910 after Cuniot died. This is a fine bow and is lively and flexible.

E.F. Ouchard

E.F. Ouchard

Perhaps most well known for training his son, Emil August Ouchard, Ouchard Sr. was a fine maker. He began his training at the age of 14 under Eugene Cuniot, who headed the large and important firm, Cuniot-Hury. In 1910, when Cuniot died, Ouchard Sr. took over the atelier and ran it until 1922. He set up his own shop the following year in Mirecourt and continued producing bows of high quality. During the early years his son was working in the shop, and during this period many of the bows Ouchard Sr. produced are of a very high quality. This bow is responsive and smooth and represents some of E.F. Ouchard’s best work. It is accompanied by a certificate by Daguin.

David Samuels

David Samuels

Based in Israel, Samuels was declared Hors Concours at the VSA competition for the consistently high quality of his bows. He trained with Stephane Tomachot before working with Jacques Francais and Rene Morel. He has also served as judge at the VSA. This bow is typical of his work, perfectly matching balance, strength, and flexibility in a bow that is easy to handle. It pulls a clear, rich sound and would be great for a performing musician.

L. Morizot, branded Renè Bernardel

L. Morizot, branded Renè Bernardel

After first training with Cuniot-Hury and then C.N. Bazin around the turn of the century, Morizot went to work with Sartory around the time of World War I. After this he set up his own shop in Mirecourt. His five sons helped him in his workshop and supplied a large number of good quality bows to various dealers in France and beyond. One of the dealers who received bows from Morizot was a Parisian firm who used the trade name Renè Bernardel. This bow is in very good condition and can perform various bow techniques of the demanding violinist.

Pierre-Yves Fuchs

Pierre-Yves Fuchs

Fuchs has won top prizes in France and America, and is one of today’s preeminent bow makers. At the VSA in 2004 he swept the competition, winning gold medals for his violin, viola, cello and bass bows. His style is unique and elegant, particularly reminiscent of Nicolas Maire. The forte of this bow is its clear, powerful projection balanced with a rich, tonal nuance.

Dupuy

Paris

Guillaume á Bruxelles (Pierre Guillaume)

Guillaume á Bruxelles (Pierre Guillaume)

Gold mounted, several examples.
Pierre Guillaume has become one of the best known and important bow makers in the World. He studied with makers like Morizot, Bazin and Ouchard in Mirecourt. He also operates the famous Maison Bernard in Brussels. We are delighted to be able to offer these fine bows.

L.Morizot

L.Morizot

Several examples

Eric Fournier

Eric Fournier

One of the most exciting young archetiers of this generation, Fournier has won several medals for his work at the VSA and Concours International de la Ville de Paris. He has worked for Georges Tepho, Ulf Johansson, and Yanick Le Canu. His style is virtuosic in concept, deeply inspired by the great makers of the early 19th century. We currently have two gold mounted bows that are ideal for chamber music

Siegfried Finkel

Siegfried Finkel

Born in 1927 in Markneukirchen, Finkel studied bowmaking with his father-in-law, Paul Weidhaas. He settled in Switzerland and established a shop which is carried on by his family. This is a good, strong bow, weighted slightly toward the head. It pulls a rich, dark sound.

Morizot stamped Collin-Mezin

Morizot stamped Collin-Mezin

After training with Cuniot-Hury and then C.N. Bazin around the turn of the century, Morizot went to work with Sartory around the time World War I began. In 1919 he set up his own shop in Mirecourt. His five sons helped him in his workshop, allowing them to supply a large number of bows to various dealers in France and beyond. One of the dealers who received bows from Morizot was the award- winning violin maker, Collin-Mezin. At 56.6 grams this bow is quite light, lively, and perfectly balanced.

Morgan Andersen

Morgan Andersen

Check out our article on this important maker. Many fine examples both gold and silver mounted.

The bow pictured here is one of the fine gold-mounted bows we have available.

Morgan won top prize for his violin bow in the prestigious instrument and bow making competition in Paris: The 2011 "Councours de Lutherie Etienne Vatelot". Congratulations!

Christian Barthe a Paris

Christian Barthe a Paris

Several examples. One of the best contemporary Parisian makers, Barthe has won prizes in various competitions, including one for his viola bow in Paris in 2016. His work is reminiscent of historic French making, yet possesses distinct characteristics all his own. The bows are remarkably responsive and supple, drawing a warm, clean sound. They are excellent for any musician seeking a fabulous modern bow at a reasonable price.

L. Morizot, unstamped

L. Morizot, unstamped

With the help of his 5 sons, Louis Morizot was able to produce a large number of well made bows. Many of his bows were left unstamped, as they were sold to dealers in France and beyond. This good quality bow is very typical of the Morizot production, and would be excellent for the orchestral musician.

L.Morizot

L.Morizot

Stamped E.Boulangeot a Lyon. Besides making bows branded with the family name, the Morizots also made bows for several dealers in France. Emile Boulangeot was the principal maker to the Lyon Conservatory and ordered bows to sell his customers. This is an excellent playing bow, with depth of tone and great clarity.

François Lotte

François Lotte

After training with, and working for, C.N. Bazin in Mirecourt until 1921, Lotte worked for Cuniot-Hury until 1925. He married into the Ouchard family in 1919, and was the brother-in-law of Emile A. Ouchard. Lotte trained several workers including LaPierre, Mangenot, and his son, Roger. His bows are of a consistently good quality, frequently using excellent wood. This bow is of a magnificent stick of pernambuco, very strong yet supple. It draws a focused, powerful sound. The winding and thumb leather are original and the bow is in superb condition.

Pierre Guillaume

Pierre Guillaume

Brussels. Special edition, reproduction of F. Tourte.

Walter Barbiero

Walter Barbiero

Padova. Originally trained as a violist, Barbiero’s passion for woodworking led him into bow making. One of the few Italian bow makers of great reputation, he has trained with such masters like Christian Barthe, Nelly Poidevin and Alfredo Clemente. He has also made bows for some of the most important musicians of our day. This bow is full of character, focused and strong, and is an excellent tool for a musician with a big technique.

L. Daguin

L. Daguin

Albert Nürnberger

The Nürnberger family worked in close concert with each other to fashion some of the finest bows in Germany. They maintained a high level of artistry over the course of their prolific oeuvre, frequently working on the Tourte model. With luthiers in the family dating back to the early 18th century, the Nürnbergers flourished as bowmakers beginning Nurnberger 18814in the late 19th century, widely recognized as the standard bearers of German bow making.

In 1890, Albert Nürnberger Jr. (b. 1854-d.1933) started branding their bows in order to make a name for the family workshop. Their workshop had already been producing fine bows for several decades, mostly supplying bows to other shops anonymously. By signing their works, they built up their business and established their reputation. This early stamp, in a font sans serif, was later changed to a font with serifs in 1910 before ultimately settling on their most widelyNurnberger 17287 used stamp, *ALBERT NÜRNBERGER*, in 1920.

With the stamp in use, the family expanded the business, wining a gold prize in Berlin, 1906, and silver prize in Leipzig, 1910. Their remarkable ability to quickly produce fine bows is due in part to the assistance of Nürnberger Jr.’s sons, Phillip Paul Nürnberger (b. 1882- d.1946), and the renowned Carl Albert Nürnberger (b. 1885- d.1971), Nurnberger 8522who worked with their meticulous father. They also trained some of Germany’s best bowmakers, including August Rao. With several excellent bowmakers working together, they were able to supply such demanding dealers as Hammig and Weichold, as well as the thriving market in the United States. After Carl Albert Nürnberger took over the shop, many of the world’s greatest concert artists, including David Oistrakh, owned and regularly performed on a Nürnberger.

We currently have several examples from the Nürnberger family, dating back to 1910. These classic examples have all the features that made their bows so popular for much of the 20th century- the workmanship is near perfect, the balance superb and the tone rich. These bows are ideal for musicians of any level, and collectors who appreciate the highest level of German bowmaking.

Gêrôme Devoivre

Gêrôme Devoivre

R.L. Steenbergen

R.L. Steenbergen

Sacramento gold/ebony

François Lotte

 

C.N.Bazin

C.N.Bazin

Mirecourt (unstamped nickel mounted). Charles Nicolas Bazin was one of the most important bow makers from Mirecourt in the last two centuries. Apart from being a great craftsman, he was also a great teacher and businessman, running a very efficient workshop that supplied bows of high quality to many shops in Paris and beyond. For this reason, his bows are frequently unbranded. This bow represents an excellent value because it is nickel mounted and has a small repair at the tip. The bow is perfectly balanced and pulls the sweet sound typical of his bows.

Albert Nürnberger

Albert Nürnberger

Peccatte Model, Markneukirchen

Emmanuel Bégin

Emmanuel Bégin

Montréal. The young Emmanuel Bégin first studied with his father, the bow maker, Louis Bégin. He also studied with Yannick Le Canu before setting up on his own in Montréal. He has won several prizes for his bows, most recently winning gold medal for his violin bow in 2014 at the Violin Society of America competition. This bow was purchased directly from the maker at the Violin Society of America meeting and demonstrates his free and elegant sculpting. The bow is very precise, articulating each note with precision and clarity.

Albert Nürnberger

Albert Nürnberger

Johannes Paulus

Johannes Paulus

Johannes Paulus first trained in the C.A. Schuster workshop in the early 1930s. He continued working in the Schuster shop after Schuster died in 1946, working closely with his father, Otto Paulus. In 1955, after taking over the Schuster workshop, he began branding his bows with his name. This bow is in mint condition and is exemplary of post WWII German making. The workmanship is exceptionally clean, and the bow would be an efficient tool for any violinist.

Thomas Dignan

Boston. This important maker has won numerous awards for his superb work. This example is silver mounted and comes from the Jay Ifshin Collection.

Peg Baumgartel

Peg Baumgartel

A very talented bow maker, Peg began her studies with Paul Siefried, concentrating on restoration and repair before opening her own shop in L.A. Peg is married to one of the world’s best bow makers, Morgan Andersen. She has focused exclusively on bow making since 2013. She has won prizes at the VSA as well as the Concours de Paris. This bow is a wonderful example of her early work and draws an articulate, crisp tone.

Garner Wilson

Garner Wilson

Werner Uebel

Werner Uebel

Markneukirchen. Uebel spent his early years working anonymously, producing student grade bows. In the early 1950s he set up his shop in Markneukirchen, steadily improving the quality of his bows. He worked closely with musicians, culminating in a silver medal in 1969. This bow is in superb condition from the mid 1950s, demonstrating his technical mastery of the craft.

Arthur Thoma

Arthur Thoma

Roger Treat

Roger Treat

Georges Apparut

Georges Apparut

 

John W. Stagg

John W. Stagg

Bristol, England.

Hoyer HP Pariser

Hoyer HP Pariser

Heinz Dolling

Heinz Dolling

Markneukirchen, gold mounted.

Stamped Knopf

Fine old German bow with an engraved silver frog and button

J. Lavest

Mirecourt

Branded A. Lamy á Paris

 

Enrico Morelli

Jacques Poullot

Albert Nürnberger

Albert Nürnberger

Markneukirchen

Bernd Dölling

Bernd Dölling

Markneukirchen, 2 examples.

Monique Poullot

Monique Poullot

Several examples. For the past decade we have been the exclusive representatives of Monique Poullot’s bows in the United States. Her training can be traced back to the bow making school in Mirecourt run by Bernard Ouchard, as her first teacher was a graduate of the program. Well steeped in the traditional methods of the great French school, she has continued perfecting her craft with such masters as the renowned Stephane Tomachot. These bows are a great value for the price. Her wood selection is first rate, consistently rich in tonal properties and flexible across the strings. Her bows are excellent for any player looking for a good, modern French bow at an affordable price.
Read here more information on Monique and Jacques Poullot.

Sebastian Dirr

Sebastian Dirr

Erlangen

J.P. Bernard

Nickel mounted

Arcos Brasil

Various makers, special model with horn or snakewood frog and pearl fleur d' lys.

Violin Bows Below $1,000

Jay Haide, J.H., Emile Richaud, Ary France Hybrid, Josef Sandner, Nicolas Delaune, Ernst Heinrich Roth, Lubas Odlas, Eduard Reichert, Chagas-Brasil, Horst John, V. Schaeffer, John Brasil, Ary France, Erich Steiner.

Read more about our affordable bow options.

Carbon Fiber Bows

Jay Haide; CodaBow: Diamond GX, SX, NX, and Prodigy; Jon Paul Bravo; J. Tabary.