Ifshin Violins
Rare & Fine Instruments

The Ifshin Collection of Fine Bows

Over the years, Jay Ifshin has acquired many fine bows from the most skilled contemporary makers and has kept some of the best for his personal collection. He has recently put several particularly nice bows from his collection on sale. This in addition to an already spectacular selection of fine bows makes now an excellent time to upgrade your bow!

From $5,000 to $10,000

J.J. Martin

J.J. Martin

Paris. Martin was an archetier of great skill whose production was of high quality right up until his death in 1910, at the age of 73. After serving an apprenticeship in his native Mirecourt, he moved to Paris where he worked for Vuillaume, going on to be one of the firm’s great makers. He established his own workshop in the early 1860s. Although he was one of the best Parisian bow makers of his time, he mostly made bows for other firms.

Louis Bazin

<a name="LouisBazin18845"></a>Louis Bazin

The youngest son of C.N. Bazin, Louis apprenticed with his father, later taking over his workshop in 1907. Throughout his career he employed bow makers to help him out –including his son- always maintaining a high standard. Many of his bows were made for dealers, but he also made many bows with his own brand. This bow is in superb condition and is easy to play, drawing a rich and nuanced tone.

C.N.Bazin, stamped J.Hel

C.N.Bazin, stamped J.Hel

Charles Nicolas Bazin was one of the most important bow makers from Mirecourt in the last two centuries. Apart from being a great craftsman, he was also a great teacher and businessman, running a very efficient workshop that supplied bows of high quality to many shops in Paris and beyond. Around 1870 he made bows for the violin maker Joseph Hel in Paris. This bow is typical of his early work, fashioned from wonderfully marbled pernambuco producing a stick that is thin, responsive and powerful.

Mars Auguste Husson

Mars Auguste Husson

Paris. After training with his family in Mirecourt, Husson worked for Thibouville-Lamy, and in 1906 for C.N. Bazin. After moving to Paris in 1910 he worked for Vigneron. In 1925 he set up his own shop, after which time he began branding his bows with his name. This bow shows the influence of Andre Vigneron, and is well balanced, strong and flexible.

Branded Ch.Enel

Branded Ch.Enel

by E.F.Ouchard. Perhaps most well known for training his son, Emil August Ouchard, Ouchard Sr. was himself a fine maker. He began his training at the age of 14 under Eugene Cuniot. In 1910, when Cuniot died, Ouchard Sr. took over the Cuniot-Hury firm and ran it until 1922. He set up his own shop the following year in Mirecourt and continued producing bows of high quality. During the early years his son was working in the shop, and during this period many of the bows Ouchard Sr. produced are of a very high quality. This fine bow is accompanied by a certificate by Rafffin.

Louis Morizot branded Boulangeot a Lyon

Louis Morizot branded Boulangeot a Lyon

This bow was made when Morizot worked with Sartory, probably before World War I. It is one of the best Morizots we have seen and is in near mint condition. Emile Boulangeot was the principal maker to the Lyon Conservatory and ordered bows to sell his customers. This bow would be a good fit for a professional musician or collector. It is accompanied by a Raffin certificate.

Gand & Bernardel

Gand & Bernardel

Possibly by Thomassin. The illustrious firm, Gand and Bernardel, hired many of the finest bowmakers in France in the late 19th century. One of these makers was Claude Thomassin, whose distinctive style during these years was heavily influenced by his first master, C.N. Bazin. This bow, likely made c. 1890, bears the faintly visible stamp of the Gand and Bernardel firm. The wear at the handle indicates that it was well loved by a player for many years, and the good condition of the stick demonstrates it has been well preserved. It feels exceptionally smooth across the strings and is offered at a player’s price.

Bernard Millant

Bernard Millant

Paris,1947 engraved on ferrule. Bernard Millant is the most respected appraiser of bows of his generation. He was also a very fine bowmaker, winning prestigious prizes in Liege in 1954 and 1969, and Ascoli Piceno in 1959, among others. He began his studies with his father and uncle, the famed luthiers, Roger and Max Millant. He perfected his bowmaking with Morizot before setting up on his own in 1950. His production is limited because he spent his entire career making, repairing and appraising bows in addition to being a talented luthier. This bow is one of the first he made and is an excellent playing stick.

L. Morizot, many examples

L. Morizot, many examples

Louis Morizot Pére began his training with Eugene Cuniot at the large Cuniot-Hury shop. At the turn of the 20th century, he continued his apprenticeship at the C.N. Bazin shop, a common step for young bowmakers perfecting their skill. Around World War I he went to work with the great Sartory, the final pass in his formal training. He established his own shop in Mirecourt in 1919 and very early on his sons began assisting him. 

By 1925 the Morizot family was able to produce a large number of well made bows, allowing them to supply a large number of bows to various dealers in France and beyond. In 1933 he incorporated his five sons into a shop know as Louis Morizot & fils (Louis Morizot and Sons).

Bernardel15538Together they produced great numbers of bows of consistent quality, frequently with superb playing characteristics. The bows of the Morizot family were sold at such firms as Serdet, Collin-Mezin, René Bernardel, Emil Boulangeot, R & M Millant and many others. Many of Louis Morizot Pére’s bows were made for, and branded by, such makers as Eugene Sartory and Victor Fetique. The Morizot bows in our collection are of their finest quality, some of them in pristine condition. They are well balanced and responsive, and represent classic French work of the 20th century.

Charles Bazin

Charles Bazin

Several examples. Son of Louis Bazin, and grandson of the extremely influential Charles Nicholas Bazin, Charles Bazin was one of the most important bow makers of the mid- 20th century. He was active in bowmaking by the age of 15, opening his own shop shortly after World War II. He had only one assistant, and made bows of fine quality for clients throughout France, the United States, and beyond. His bows are strong yet sweet, bridging the gap between the old tradition and new school of French bowmaking. They represent an excellent value in a classic French bow.

Justin Poirson

Justin Poirson

Paris. Poirson was a pupil of the great Nicolas Maire and then went on to work with J.B.Vuillaume where he got to know the great bowmakers of the time. After Vuillaume’s death he worked with Gand and Bernardel. In 1880 at the age of only 29, he had set up his own workshop. This bow has exceptional playing qualities and we consider it an excellent value in that it is nickel mounted.

Cuniot- Hury

Cuniot- Hury

In 1884, at the age of 22, Eugene Cuniot took over his father’s firm, later adding his wife’s well known last name to his brand. Like most makers around the turn of the century, he was greatly influenced by C.N. Bazin, both in style and business model. Thus he had many archetiers in his workshop and supplied bows to dealers and violin shops throughout France. Despite having up to 12 makers working for him he was able to maintain quite a high level of quality. One of the bow makers, Emile Francois Ouchard, took over the firm in 1910 after Cuniot died. This is a fine bow and is lively and flexible.

E.F. Ouchard

E.F. Ouchard

Perhaps most well known for training his son, Emil August Ouchard, Ouchard Sr. was a fine maker. He began his training at the age of 14 under Eugene Cuniot, who headed the large and important firm, Cuniot-Hury. In 1910, when Cuniot died, Ouchard Sr. took over the atelier and ran it until 1922. He set up his own shop the following year in Mirecourt and continued producing bows of high quality. During the early years his son was working in the shop, and during this period many of the bows Ouchard Sr. produced are of a very high quality. This bow is responsive and smooth and represents some of E.F. Ouchard’s best work. It is accompanied by a certificate by Daguin.

David Samuels

David Samuels

Based in Israel, Samuels was declared Hors Concours at the VSA competition for the consistently high quality of his bows. He trained with Stephane Tomachot before working with Jacques Francais and Rene Morel. He has also served as judge at the VSA. This bow is typical of his work, perfectly matching balance, strength, and flexibility in a bow that is easy to handle. It pulls a clear, rich sound and would be great for a performing musician.

Pierre-Yves Fuchs

Pierre-Yves Fuchs

Fuchs has won top prizes in France and America, and is one of today’s preeminent bow makers. At the VSA in 2004 he swept the competition, winning gold medals for his violin, viola, cello and bass bows. His style is unique and elegant, particularly reminiscent of Nicolas Maire. The forte of this bow is its clear, powerful projection balanced with a rich, tonal nuance.

Guillaume á Bruxelles (Pierre Guillaume)

Guillaume á Bruxelles (Pierre Guillaume)

Gold and silver mounted, many examples.

Pierre Guillaume has become one of the best known and important bow makers in the world. He studied with many fine French makers including Morizot, Bazin and Ouchard in Mirecourt. He also operates the famous Maison Bernard in Brussels. We are delighted to be able to offer these fine bows.

Eric Fournier

Eric Fournier

One of the most exciting young archetiers of this generation, Fournier has won several medals for his work at the VSA and Concours International de la Ville de Paris. He has worked for Georges Tepho, Ulf Johansson, and Yanick Le Canu. His style is virtuosic in concept, deeply inspired by the great makers of the early 19th century. We currently have two gold mounted bows that are ideal for chamber music

Siegfried Finkel

Siegfried Finkel

Born in 1927 in Markneukirchen, Finkel studied bowmaking with his father-in-law, Paul Weidhaas. He settled in Switzerland and established a shop which is carried on by his family. This is a good, strong bow, weighted slightly toward the head. It pulls a rich, dark sound.

Morizot stamped Collin-Mezin

Morizot stamped Collin-Mezin

After training with Cuniot-Hury and then C.N. Bazin around the turn of the century, Morizot went to work with Sartory around the time World War I began. In 1919 he set up his own shop in Mirecourt. His five sons helped him in his workshop, allowing them to supply a large number of bows to various dealers in France and beyond. One of the dealers who received bows from Morizot was the award- winning violin maker, Collin-Mezin. At 56.6 grams this bow is quite light, lively, and perfectly balanced.

Morgan Andersen

Morgan Andersen

Check out our article on this important maker. Many fine examples both gold and silver mounted.

The bow pictured here is one of the fine gold-mounted bows we have available.

Morgan won top prize for his violin bow in the prestigious instrument and bow making competition in Paris: The 2011 "Councours de Lutherie Etienne Vatelot". Congratulations!

Christian Barthe a Paris

Christian Barthe a Paris

Several examples. One of the best contemporary Parisian makers, Barthe has won prizes in various competitions, including one for his viola bow in Paris in 2016. His work is reminiscent of historic French making, yet possesses distinct characteristics all his own. The bows are remarkably responsive and supple, drawing a warm, clean sound. They are excellent for any musician seeking a fabulous modern bow at a reasonable price.

L.Morizot

L.Morizot

Stamped E.Boulangeot a Lyon. Besides making bows branded with the family name, the Morizots also made bows for several dealers in France. Emile Boulangeot was the principal maker to the Lyon Conservatory and ordered bows to sell his customers. This is an excellent playing bow, with depth of tone and great clarity.

François Lotte

François Lotte

After training with, and working for, C.N. Bazin in Mirecourt until 1921, Lotte worked for Cuniot-Hury until 1925. He married into the Ouchard family in 1919, and was the brother-in-law of Emile A. Ouchard. Lotte trained several workers including LaPierre, Mangenot, and his son, Roger. His bows are of a consistently good quality, frequently using excellent wood. This bow is of a magnificent stick of pernambuco, very strong yet supple. It draws a focused, powerful sound. The winding and thumb leather are original and the bow is in superb condition.

Pierre Guillaume

Pierre Guillaume

Brussels. Silver mounted. Special edition, reproduction of F. Tourte. Pierre Guillaume has become one of the best known and important bow makers in the world. He studied with makers like Morizot, Bazin and Ouchard in Mirecourt. He also operates the famous Maison Bernard in Brussels.

Walter Barbiero

Walter Barbiero

Padova. Originally trained as a violist, Barbiero’s passion for woodworking led him into bow making. One of the few Italian bow makers of great reputation, he has trained with such masters like Christian Barthe, Nelly Poidevin and Alfredo Clemente. He has also made bows for some of the most important musicians of our day. This bow is full of character, focused and strong, and is an excellent tool for a musician with a big technique.

Franck Daguin

Franck Daguin

Lyon, France. Franck Daguin studied and worked with Jean-Frederic Schmitt for ten years and then with luthier Daniel Scaffi before settling in Lyon, France. Daguin has won prizes at the spéciale Paris in 1991, the Grand Prix des Métiers d'Art Lyon in 1992 and the spéciale Paris in 2004. For years, Jay Ifshin has visited Franck at his workshop in Lyon, France and always looks forward to seeing his fine new bows as well as his restorations of great old master bows.

Albert Nürnberger

The Nürnberger family worked in close concert with each other to fashion some of the finest bows in Germany. They maintained a high level of artistry over the course of their prolific oeuvre, frequently working on the Tourte model. With luthiers in the family dating back to the early 18th century, the Nürnbergers flourished as bowmakers beginning Nurnberger 18814in the late 19th century, widely recognized as the standard bearers of German bow making.

In 1890, Albert Nürnberger Jr. (b. 1854-d.1933) started branding their bows in order to make a name for the family workshop. Their workshop had already been producing fine bows for several decades, mostly supplying bows to other shops anonymously. By signing their works, they built up their business and established their reputation. This early stamp, in a font sans serif, was later changed to a font with serifs in 1910 before ultimately settling on their most widelyNurnberger 17287 used stamp, *ALBERT NÜRNBERGER*, in 1920.

With the stamp in use, the family expanded the business, wining a gold prize in Berlin, 1906, and silver prize in Leipzig, 1910. Their remarkable ability to quickly produce fine bows is due in part to the assistance of Nürnberger Jr.’s sons, Phillip Paul Nürnberger (b. 1882- d.1946), and the renowned Carl Albert Nürnberger (b. 1885- d.1971), Nurnberger 8522who worked with their meticulous father. They also trained some of Germany’s best bowmakers, including August Rao. With several excellent bowmakers working together, they were able to supply such demanding dealers as Hammig and Weichold, as well as the thriving market in the United States. After Carl Albert Nürnberger took over the shop, many of the world’s greatest concert artists, including David Oistrakh, owned and regularly performed on a Nürnberger.

We currently have several examples from the Nürnberger family, dating back to 1910. These classic examples have all the features that made their bows so popular for much of the 20th century- the workmanship is near perfect, the balance superb and the tone rich. These bows are ideal for musicians of any level, and collectors who appreciate the highest level of German bowmaking.

Gêrôme Devoivre

Gêrôme Devoivre

R.L. Steenbergen

R.L. Steenbergen

Sacramento gold/ebony